C.M. Beckett

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

blackamazon:

another-concrete-r0se:

themindsetofimperfection:

afrogirlwonder:

Relevant

I’ve been waiting for someone to make this a gif

damn near 30 years ago and still relevant

Can someone show me a similarly frank conversation about rape culture in any of your progressive faves….

I’ll Wait

I think it’s super interesting this convo is happening between two men of colour BECAUSE they’re so much more likely to be accused of or picked up during or seen as rapists because of the historical necessities of white supremacy.

Like would a conversation like this happen between two white men of the same era, or now, did it, has it would it?

(Source: matildaswormwood, via gimpnelly)

aaronfg:

Blast Furnace Funnies by Frank Santoro
I got this a SPX over the weekend. Just finished reading it now. It’s really great. Has me thinking about my own childhood, the locations and environments that I grew up around. 
It’s printed on newsprint. Large. You open it up wide and the spreads fill your field of view. You’re in there. 
We don’t read comics in this size really. Newspaper comic strips were presented like this, sure. But never a single narrative. Just tons of different comic strips and styles fighting for your attention.
It’s very different (for me, anyway) to have a single comic be this big. I remember seeing that huge Little Nemo book that printed McCay’s comics at the large original size. Seeing the art at that size does make it feel different. Just the physicality of reading it changes how you experience it.
I found myself scanning over each large panel, my eyes doing dolly moves and pans, looking at the fields and houses Santoro drew. Perhaps the large size helped dictate the speed I read it. Or the narration broken up with “silent” panels of landscapes, trains, skies.
Whatever it was, I really dug it. 
I recommend you buy a copy and read it. Preferably late at night/early in the morning when you’ve got the world to yourself. (That’s just my romanticized opinion of how you should do it…But I’m right!)

Frank Santoro - the man’s awesome.

aaronfg:

Blast Furnace Funnies by Frank Santoro

I got this a SPX over the weekend. Just finished reading it now. It’s really great. Has me thinking about my own childhood, the locations and environments that I grew up around. 

It’s printed on newsprint. Large. You open it up wide and the spreads fill your field of view. You’re in there. 

We don’t read comics in this size really. Newspaper comic strips were presented like this, sure. But never a single narrative. Just tons of different comic strips and styles fighting for your attention.

It’s very different (for me, anyway) to have a single comic be this big. I remember seeing that huge Little Nemo book that printed McCay’s comics at the large original size. Seeing the art at that size does make it feel different. Just the physicality of reading it changes how you experience it.

I found myself scanning over each large panel, my eyes doing dolly moves and pans, looking at the fields and houses Santoro drew. Perhaps the large size helped dictate the speed I read it. Or the narration broken up with “silent” panels of landscapes, trains, skies.

Whatever it was, I really dug it. 

I recommend you buy a copy and read it. Preferably late at night/early in the morning when you’ve got the world to yourself. (That’s just my romanticized opinion of how you should do it…But I’m right!)

Frank Santoro - the man’s awesome.

(via spx)

CAPTAIN AMERICA: Streets of Poison!  

Another summer spectacular double-shipping event from my youth.  This story sees Cap questioning his super soldier serum.  He becomes hooked on a street drug that makes him irrational and aggressive, and he wonders at the fact that a different drug is what basically made him who he is and wonders if he is an addict, because of that, and works to do something about it.  But, in the end, he discovers that the serum had long since worked its way out of his system.

(if any of this is wrong, forgive me; I’m working on a twenty-plus-year-old memory here)

Story by Mark Gruenwald.  Art by one of my favorites at the time, Ron Lim.  I enjoyed this, when I read it, but I think this is one of the ones I won’t be going back to re-read.  

chris

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.
Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.
READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.

READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

New (teen) Titans #50:  ”Who is Wonder Girl?” 
I didn’t read the first run of the Wolfman/Perez Teen Titans.  I wasn’t collecting comics when they started, and the title wasn’t one my local bookstore carried anyway.  I know I would have if I’d seen the Perez artwork, but that was not to be the case.  Had to get them through Mile High and other dealers, after the fact.  
But this ad … when I saw it, I knew I had to get this book.  Perez’s art had come such a long way in such a short time - tighter and more defined.  Love it.  I might have to dig these issues out and see how they hold up.
chris

New (teen) Titans #50:  ”Who is Wonder Girl?” 

I didn’t read the first run of the Wolfman/Perez Teen Titans.  I wasn’t collecting comics when they started, and the title wasn’t one my local bookstore carried anyway.  I know I would have if I’d seen the Perez artwork, but that was not to be the case.  Had to get them through Mile High and other dealers, after the fact.  

But this ad … when I saw it, I knew I had to get this book.  Perez’s art had come such a long way in such a short time - tighter and more defined.  Love it.  I might have to dig these issues out and see how they hold up.

chris