C.M. Beckett

franksantoro:

To paraphrase Brandon Graham paraphrasing KRS-One -“I’m talking to, like, three of you people out there”. (around the 39 min mark  - http://www.inkstuds.org/brandon-graham-frank-santoro-and-michael-deforge/)
The most common questions I get about the course:
How does the course work?
The way the course works is that there is a private blog where you get all of your assignments. This blog is updated everyday with demos related to each assignment. We do a lot of fast drawing to get you thinking about sequencing much like a storyboard artist. Over the 8 week course you will create a 16 page “signature” - that means that you will basically draw two pages a week. Email me - santoroschoolATgmail - and I will send you an invite to the course that just wrapped so you can see how it works for yourself
Read More

franksantoro:

To paraphrase Brandon Graham paraphrasing KRS-One -“I’m talking to, like, three of you people out there”. (around the 39 min mark  - http://www.inkstuds.org/brandon-graham-frank-santoro-and-michael-deforge/)

The most common questions I get about the course:

How does the course work?

The way the course works is that there is a private blog where you get all of your assignments. This blog is updated everyday with demos related to each assignment. We do a lot of fast drawing to get you thinking about sequencing much like a storyboard artist. Over the 8 week course you will create a 16 page “signature” - that means that you will basically draw two pages a week. Email me - santoroschoolATgmail - and I will send you an invite to the course that just wrapped so you can see how it works for yourself

Read More

(via comicsworkbook)

When I started collecting comics, around 1984, the high numbers on the superhero books kept me away, worried that all the backstory would be too much and too convoluted for me to begin reading “at that late date.”  Which was a foolish point of view, I admit.  
But whenn I saw this book on the stands, I couldn’t walk away without buying it.  Come on.  The Hulk holding up a freakin’ mountain in order to save the other heroes.  How the hell were they going to get out of that one?  And the way Reed Richards (I think it was Reed, maybe it was Cap?) antagonizes the Hulk in order to make him madder, and, as a result, make him stronger, so that he can hold that mountain up and eventually give the heroes a chance to escape…that was amazing.  Loved it.  Love it still.
chris

When I started collecting comics, around 1984, the high numbers on the superhero books kept me away, worried that all the backstory would be too much and too convoluted for me to begin reading “at that late date.”  Which was a foolish point of view, I admit.  

But whenn I saw this book on the stands, I couldn’t walk away without buying it.  Come on.  The Hulk holding up a freakin’ mountain in order to save the other heroes.  How the hell were they going to get out of that one?  And the way Reed Richards (I think it was Reed, maybe it was Cap?) antagonizes the Hulk in order to make him madder, and, as a result, make him stronger, so that he can hold that mountain up and eventually give the heroes a chance to escape…that was amazing.  Loved it.  Love it still.

chris

chrisroberson:

funwrecker:

americanninjax:

bellecs:

Asked by ANON: Favorite 80s Fantasy Films

The 80s was truly the best decade for cheesy 80s fantasy films. If you haven’t seen all of these, you’re missing out. In order of pictures:

  • Legend (1985) 
  • The Last Unicorn (1982)
  • Ladyhawke (1985)
  • Labyrinth (1986)
  • The Secret of Nimh (1982) 
  • The Neverending Story (1984)
  • Red Sonja (1985)
  • Masters of the Universe (1987)
  • Return to Oz (1985)
  • Highlander (1986)
  • Conan the Barbarian (1982)
  • Krull (1983)
  • Excalibur (1981)
  • Clash of the Titans (1981)
  • Dark Crystal (1982)
  • The Princess Bride (1987)
  • Willow (1988)
  • The Beastmaster (1982)

This set is completely representative of me

Wow. Same actually

Agree.

This book was huge, for me.  I saw that image and I had to buy it.  I love this storyline, but my entire Cap run (roughly 80-100 issues between 300 & 400) got trashed during my “great comic purge,” when I was at a low point, personally.  I will have to replace those books, at least from here on to 350 or so (because Kieron Dwyer comes onto the book and just kills it, artistically!).  Ah, memories.
chris

This book was huge, for me.  I saw that image and I had to buy it.  I love this storyline, but my entire Cap run (roughly 80-100 issues between 300 & 400) got trashed during my “great comic purge,” when I was at a low point, personally.  I will have to replace those books, at least from here on to 350 or so (because Kieron Dwyer comes onto the book and just kills it, artistically!).  Ah, memories.

chris

Another ad from issue #2 of Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.  Thinking the company might have reconsidered their brand name before launching.  
chris

Another ad from issue #2 of Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.  Thinking the company might have reconsidered their brand name before launching.  

chris

seanhowe:

(1) Walter Simonson, Joe Rubinstein, Pat Broderick, and Ralph Reese pose for Larry Hama.

(2) Marvel Premiere #19, November 1974. Art by Larry Hama and Dick Giordano. Words by Doug Moench.

(via ryanklindsay)

Happy Birthday to the KING!



Jack Kirby would have turned 97 today, and all across the internet, fans and creators alike are celebrating the man who stands head and shoulders above all other western comic creators.



A young Jewish kid from the rough streets of Depression-era New York and a veteran of the second World War, Kirby was a force of nature whose imagination seems to have been limitless.  There are many creators today riding on his coattails, working on the myriad characters he created or co-created:

- Captain America
- The Avengers
- X-Men
- Darkseid
- Captain Victory
- the Fantastic Four
- Fin Fang Foom
- Thor (for Marvel comics)
- Nick Fury
- the Forever People
- OMAC
- Kamandi
- Challengers of the Unknown
- Galactus
- Silver Surfer
- the Incredible Hulk
- etc. etc. etc.




These creators love to play in Kirby’s “sandbox,” paying homage to the artist who invigorated the comics medium with an energy and a boldness that launched it on the path of popularity that has now seen its influence blast into the film making business in a manner not thought possible fifteen years ago.  And yet, their fealty falls short because they are not adhering to Kirby’s first rule of comic creation - go make something new.  That, as much as anything is Kirby’s lasting legacy.



I was first introduced to Kirby with the Super Powers mini-series and toy lines of the mid-1980s.  This was unfortunate.  I remember being unimpressed with his art.  I thought it was ugly and didn’t adhere to the idealized “realistic” imagery of a John Byrne or a George Perez (still my favorite comic artist, whose work tugs at my nostalgic insides any time I see a new book from him).



Years later - and I wish I knew what prompted this, because it was a full-on re-evaluation of multiple silver and golden age artists, on my part - I finally “got” Kirby.  It may have been a result of hearing Jon Bogdanove speak affectionately about Kirby and his influence and his versatility, along with an analysis of what it was about his Marvel, and subsequent DC, work that spoke to me.  The energy in the pages, the characters bursting from the panel borders, elongated in extreme kineticism, large than life characters that refused to be penned in by these artificial boundaries.  I saw it.  I understood it.  And I appreciated it.  Very much.




Since then, I’ve done my best to educate myself on Kirby (i.e. I’ve read a lot of his comics that I missed out on before, and big props to Marvel & DC and their relatively recent repackaging of Kirby’s early works into lovely hardbound collections).  His art - and the adventure and imagination present in his stories, particularly his 1970s work for DC - is a wonder to behold.  There’s nothing as satisfying, for me, as reading a Kirby comics, whether it’s something new (to me) or something I’ve read before.  The layouts, the impressionistic figure work, the energy - it’s all pure bliss.



There’s a part of me that regrets not grokking to Kirby earlier, but that is mitigated by the fact that I now have more opportunities to enjoy his work while also realizing there’s still a wealth of great stuff I can look forward to.




Happy Kingday!     BOOOOOOOMMMMMM!!!!!

chris

In honor of the King’s birthday (JACK KIRBY, for those not in the know) this series is at the top of the to-read pile, currently.  I read issue #2 last night.  Wonderful.  Kirby’s so good.

In honor of the King’s birthday (JACK KIRBY, for those not in the know) this series is at the top of the to-read pile, currently.  I read issue #2 last night.  Wonderful.  Kirby’s so good.

Oh, man!  I had this toy - at least I had the Bionic Man - but I’d forgotten you could “perform bionic surgery.”  Loved this toy as a kid. 
[found the ad on the inside front cover of Jack Kirby’s 2001 #2, a series I finally picked up and have started reading. Looooove 70s Kirby]
chris

Oh, man!  I had this toy - at least I had the Bionic Man - but I’d forgotten you could “perform bionic surgery.”  Loved this toy as a kid. 

[found the ad on the inside front cover of Jack Kirby’s 2001 #2, a series I finally picked up and have started reading. Looooove 70s Kirby]

chris